WAR AS SEEN BY ...

 

After Stanley Kubrick, we might be surprised to find the likes of Woody Allen and François Truffaut among our filmmaking warriors: in either case, we are far from the military epic of Stanley Kubrick. With Woody Allen, war becomes a pretext for poking fun, for deconstructing the absurdity of war through lighthearted satire. From his take on South American guerrilla fighters in Bananas (1971) to his fresh look at the Napoleonic wars in Love and Death (1975), Woody Allen pre Annie Hall is something of a depraved and childish slapstick comic. Nothing could be further from the truth, of course, with Truffaut. Whether represented through book-loving resistance fighters opposing a prohibitive dictatorship in his social science fiction work Fahrenheit 451 (1966), through the separation of two friends (one French, other German) in the love triangle formed with Jeanne Moreau in Jules and Jim (1962), as the reason for commemorating the dead in The Green Room (1978), or finally as the setting for a “theatre production” taking place under Occupation in The Last Metro (1980), war always goes hand in hand with both love and death in Truffaut’s work. These are all themes close to Truffaut’s heart, which war accentuates as a result of its tragic and collective nature. Was it not Truffaut himself who said: “What is appalling about war is that it deprives man of his individual struggle…?”

- Olivier Broche



 

BEING MOVED WITH FRANÇOIS TRUFFAUT

 

THE FILMS


FAHRENHEIT 451
, François Truffaut (1966) - United Kingdom/France

JULES AND JIM, François Truffaut (1965) - France

THE GREEN ROOM
,
François Truffaut (1978) - France

THE LAST METRO,
François Truffaut (1980) - France

 

 


THE LIGHTER SIDE OF WAR WITH WOODY ALLEN

 

THE FILMS


LOVE AND DEATH,
Woody Allen (1975) – France/United States

BANANAS, Woody Allen (1971) – United States 

 

 

Institutional Partners
MINISTERE-DE-L-EDUCATION REGION GRAND EST CHALONS-AGGLO   
 CNC-DEVELOPPE  VILLE--DE-CHALONS Label centenaire   ECPAD  AMNESTY LA-COMETE

Enregistrer